Chemistry that can stop your food rotting.

A hotel in Reykjavík has on display a McDonald’s burger and fries, seemingly undecomposed after 2,512 days – and counting. It was bought on October 30, 2009, the day that the last McDonald’s in Iceland closed. But you don’t have to go to Reykjavík to see it: it has its own webcam so you can watch it from your armchair.

/…/ Let’s start with uncooked rice – in many peoples’ minds it’s a foodstuff that will keep for a long while. Experts reckon that polished white rice will keep for 30 years when properly sealed and stored in a cool, dry place. This means in an airtight container with oxygen absorbers that remove the gas that can oxidise molecules in the rice.

Hotter food goes off faster; as you may remember from school science lessons, chemical reactions are faster at high temperatures because hotter molecules have more energy and so are more likely to react when they collide. It’s one reason we have fridges. But there is a limit. Above a certain temperature (approximately 50-100°C), the enzymes in a bacterium get denatured – their “active site”, where its catalytic activity happens and it binds to molecules to carry out reactions on them, loses its shape and can no longer carry out reactions.

read the full article.. theconversation.com/heres-the-clever-chemistry-that-can-stop-your-food-rotting-64318

[my comment: high temperatures – over 110°C – also deprive food of its original nutritional value, thus you may feel eaten but you won’t get all the elements that body needs for processing the eaten food.. which ultimately causes illnesses. long time preservation of food isn’t always a good thing. in many cases not only “enzymes in a bacterium get denatured” but also the essential enzymes for healthy digestion in human body. same happens using microwave owens.]


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Four basic personality types identified: Pessimistic; optimistic; envious and trusting.

A computer algorithm organized 90% of people into four groups: the largest group, accounting for 30%, being the Envious — those who don’t actually mind what they achieve, as long as they’re better than everyone else; next are the Optimists — who believe that they and their partner will make the best choice for both of them — on 20%. Also on 20% are the Pessimists — who select the option which they see as the lesser of two evils — and the Trusting group — who are born collaborators and who will always cooperate and who don’t really mind if they win or lose.

/…/ According to Yamir Moreno, who is the coordinator of the Cosnet group (Grupo de Redes y Sistemas Complejos / Networks and Complex Systems Group) at BIFI (Instituto de Biocomputación y Física de Sistemas Complejos / Institute of Biocomputation and the Physics of Complex Systems) at the Universidad de Zaragoza, and also president of the Sociedad de Sistemas Complejos (Complex Systems Society), “The results go against certain theories; the one which states that humans act purely rationally for example, and, therefore, they should be taken into consideration in redesigning social and economic policies, as well as those involved in cooperation.” He goes on to say that, “these types of studies are important because they improve existing theories on human behavior by giving them an experimental base.”

read the full article.. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160915085719.htm


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Emotions mapped in the human brain.

According to the research team – including Prof. Kevin LaBar of Duke University in Durham, NC – it is well established that movies, music, and other external stimuli can trigger emotions that are reflected in patterns of brain activity. But what about past emotional experiences? Can the feelings induced by the memory of a birthday party or the recollection of the loss of a loved one be represented in brain activity? This is what Prof. LaBar and colleagues set out to investigate in their new study. The researchers note that previous studies have shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can differentiate between thoughts of specific objects, such as a face or a house. In this study, the researchers applied an algorithm – incorporating various models of emotional experience – to the fMRI scans of 21 university students. This allowed them to pinpoint seven brain activity patterns – or “maps” – that reflect certain emotional states, including contentment, amusement, surprise, fear, anger, sadness, and neutrality.

read the full article.. www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/312915.php


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Researchers use stem cells to grow 3-D lung-in-a-dish.

By coating tiny gel beads with lung-derived stem cells and then allowing them to self-assemble into the shapes of the air sacs found in human lungs, researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have succeeded in creating three-dimensional lung “organoids.” The laboratory-grown lung-like tissue can be used to study diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, which has traditionally been difficult to study using conventional methods.

/…/ Gomperts and her colleagues started with stem cells created using cells from adult lungs. They used those cells to coat sticky hydrogel beads, and then they partitioned these beads into small wells, each only 7 millimeters across. Inside each well, the lung cells grew around the beads, which linked them and formed an evenly distributed three-dimensional pattern. To show that these tiny organoids mimicked the structure of actual lungs, the researchers compared the lab-grown tissues with real sections of human lung.

read the full article.. medicalxpress.com/news/2016-09-stem-cells-d-lung-in-a-dish.html


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